Table of Flour Facts (in progress)

The purpose of this article is create list of flours (rice, wheat…) and starches that can be used for cooking. I will make comments about each ingredient’s baking profile, where to find it, and other information I feel is of interest. The nutritional values of each item are based on the label information.  This article will be updated as time goes by to add ingredients and information.

Please let me know if things are missing or wanted.

At the bottom I intend to have every item in a table with the name,   calories, protein, fat, and grams of fiber by volume and by weight.

I did this so the ingredients could be compared to each other in a mostly standard way.  On labels of these flours you can find the information quoted by ounces, grams, cups, or fluid ounces.  I first wanted this information because I wanted to try to make a gluten free bread flour with the same protein level as traditional wheat bread flour.

Please let me know if their is anything else you wish to add to the table.

 


 

Brown Rice Flour

Staple for many Gluten-Free recipes.   Usually not used a the sole flour in a recipe.  Although you will see this on the normal shelves in high end grocery shelves it is perishable.  If made from scratch store in the fridge.  If prepacked, refrigerate after opening and do not keep even the unopened package at room temperature for long.

I have never seen this in the refrigerated section of a store but it probably should be there.

Considered a whole grain flour.  Frequently paired with white rice flour.

Available on the internet, at high end grocery stores and occasionally at major chain grocery stores.  In general not available at Asian grocery stores.

Neutral flavor

White Rice Flour  (not glutenous rice flour)

Usually not used a the sole flour in a recipe.

Available on the internet, at high end grocery stores and frequently even at major chain grocery stores where it may be sold in a box. It is almost always available in Asian grocery stores and at the cheapest price.

Not a whole grain flour.  Usually paired with a whole grain flour in most recipes.

Neutral flavor

Corn Masa

Ground corn (not as fine as most flour)  then treated with lime. Available just about anywhere here in the southwest sold next to the wheat flours. Intended to make tortillas and some other Latin american dishes.  Very inexpensive.  would be gluten free naturally unless cross contaminated. Recently I have been packages labeled “Gluten Free” which would mean that the company has been careful.

Adds a popcorn flavor to foods so limit its use except for items like corn bread which are expected to have a corn taste.

Corn Starch

Should be available at any grocery store.  Starch from the corn removed and powdered finely.  Used for thickening. coating items to be deep fried.  Even though it thickens it can not be used as a substitute for gluten.

Powdered Sugar / Confectioners Sugar /10X

DANGER hidden ingredient: corn starch or perhaps wheat flour or other ingredients to prevent caking

I wish this ingredient had a different name. This is a mixture of finely ground sugar and corn starch.  Lots of uses and available anywhere flour is sold.

It is possible to get finely ground pure sugar but it is expensive compared to the size of the package.  I have seen finely ground sugar sold in normal grocery stores next to the dry creamers for coffee.  It is generally better to grind normal granular sugar as needed it a food processor.

 

 

 



 

Table of Nutrition Values notes:  These values are calculated based on food labels.  I don’t have a food lab. Rounding errors should be expected.  Different companies may have different numbers because of differences in processing (fine VS course ground etc. ). Or perhaps because they tested at different labs or…?

Key follows the table
Nutritional Values
ITEM
Vol Cal
Vol Prot
Vol Fat
Vol Fiber
Weight
Gram Cal
Gram Prot
Gram Fat
Gram Fiber
Storage
brown rice flour
 140
 3
 1
 2
 40
175
 3.75
 1.25
 2.5
 R
white rice flour
 110
 2
 0
 2
 29
190
 3.44
 0
 3.44
 S
powdered Sugar
 120
 0
 0
 0
 30
200
 0
 0
 0
 S
corn masa
 104
 2.75
 1.1
 1.75
 28.5
183.45
 4.82
 1.92
 3.07
 S
oat flour
 121.2
 5.3
 2.2
 3.0
 30
200
 8.75
 3.75
 5.00
 S
sweet white sorgum flour
 120
 4
 1
 3
 34
176.47
 5.88
 1.47
 4.41
 S
all purpose wheat flour
 100
 3
 0
 1
 30
166.66
 5.00
 0
 0
 S
quinoa flour
 110
 4
 1.5
 2
 28
196.43
 7.14
 2.6
 3.57
 S
buckwheat flour
 113.39
 3.19
 .58
2.32
33
171.80
4.84
.88
3.52
 S
glutenous/sweet rice flour
 180
 3
 .5
 1
51
176
 3
.5
 1
 S

If you know about “Significant Digits” yes I have sinned in the above table.  This table is only a rough guide. More accurate data that I can legally post would be appreciated.

Vol Cal is the number of Calories in a volume of 1/4 cup (59 ml).

Vol Prot is the number of grams of protein in 1/4 cup

Vol Fat is the number of grams of fat in 1/4 cup

Vol Fiber is the number of grams of fiber in 1/4 cup

Weight is the number of grams in 1/4 cup (59 ml).  This is obtained from the label or I have measured it in an unpacked cup measure

Gram Cal, Gram Prot, Gram Fat,  and Gram Fiber are the Calories, protein, fat and fiber in 50 grams of the ingredient.

Storage is recommended storage for the item.  R = store in the fridge, S = shelf stable, F = freeze,  ? = conflicting advice.  If you have the space in your fridge almost all of these ingredients would last longer if refrigerated.

 

 

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